'Significant’ rises in uni fees: NATSEM research

University fee increases are likely to be “significant”, and repayments for some degrees, such as science, will triple and take double the time to pay off, modelling by the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling at the University of Canberra reveals in an article in The Conversation today.

NATSEM says “the impact will be felt most strongly for low-pay occupations such as nursing or education, and across the board the impacts are larger for females”.

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Pyne pays for ignoring the lessons of history

Anyone with a strong interest in higher education policy and a clear memory of 1999 would have had a strange feeling of déjà vu on Budget night.

As the Abbott Government unveiled its higher education package on May 13, the response might well have been:  “Now, where’ve I heard that before?”

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Abbott Government not so open for business

With only one week to go, details of the Abbott Government’s innovation support programs are still up in the air, leaving Australia’s business community in the lurch.

“The Government’s so-called Entrepreneurs’ Infrastructure Programme is supposed to be up and running on 1 July 2014, but there are no program guidelines, and only a vague outline of what it will actually do,” Shadow Industry Minister Senator Kim Carr said.

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Fee hikes a worry for science and engineering students

Peak academic and professional bodies have warned the Abbott Government its higher education changes will deter science and engineering students, depriving Australia of much-needed skills for the jobs of the future.

The Australian Council of Engineering Deans and the Royal Australian Chemical Institute have written separately to the Government warning that sharp fee hikes will see a downturn in enrolments and jeopardise the nation’s long-term economic prosperity.

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Higher education mustn’t mean a second mortgage

At about the same time Tony Abbott began his visit to the United States, a US congresswoman issued a grim assessment. 

“Young people can’t buy homes, can’t start small businesses, can’t buy cars, can’t take the economic steps that are not just good for themselves individually but good for the economy overall.” 

Why not? Student debt, said Senator Elizabeth Warren.

“Student loan debt is dragging down the whole economy,” she said. And it is, too, to the tune of $US1.2 trillion. 

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End secrecy over $3 billion East-West link

The Abbott Government has the opportunity to end the shroud of secrecy surrounding the awarding of $3 billion of Commonwealth funding for the East-West Link, Labor Senator for Victoria Kim Carr said today.

Last night the Australian Senate called on the Federal Government to produce documents relating to the East-West Link business case by July 7.

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Scientists lose jobs at CSIRO’s Aspendale labs

Staff at CSIRO’s Marine and Atmospheric Research laboratories at Aspendale have been told eight marine and atmospheric research positions are to go, and the facility will be closed at an unspecified date.

Shadow Minister for Research Senator Kim Carr and Member for Isaacs Mark Dreyfus QC today visited the Aspendale laboratories to tour the facility and meet with staff.

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Abbott Govt destroys the fair go for regional students

La Trobe University students met with Shadow Higher Education Minister Senator Kim Carr and Member for Bendigo Lisa Chesters MP in Bendigo today to discuss their concerns about the Abbott Government’s proposed changes to higher education.

Senator Carr said students were entitled to be worried about the prospect of paying $100,000 for a degree and being saddled with crippling debts that could take years to pay off.

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Devastating cuts to CSIRO in Hobart

The Abbott Government’s savage funding cuts to CSIRO are taking their toll with news today of 18 marine and atmospheric research positions to go from Hobart’s Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR) division.

Shadow Minister for Research Senator Kim Carr said this was another tragic blow to CSIRO and to Australia’s standing as a leader in this field of research. 

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Cuts hit CSIRO climate research

Climate, marine and atmospheric research has taken a hit with 28 full-time scientists to lose their jobs as a result of the Abbott Government’s savage funding cuts to CSIRO.

CSIRO has told staff a total of 31 jobs will go, including 18 research scientists from Hobart’s Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR) division and eight from the Aspendale Laboratory for climate and atmospheric research in Melbourne. 

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